Future Shop to Donate $150,000 to Canadian High Schools for Tech Lab Grants

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Future Shop has committed $150,000 for Canadian high schools through its Future Generation Tech Lab grants program.

A total of $150,000 in funding is now available for secondary schools looking to improve their technology offerings for classes or programs primarily for students in grades 9-12. The maximum amount a high school can receive is $20,000. 

The “Future Generation Tech Lab” program exists to “help reduce the economic and digital divide for youth by providing them with modern technology essential to inspire and achieve their highest potential as they move into post-secondary education and the workforce.”

“It’s always an exciting time of year when we can announce the return of Tech Lab grants for secondary schools across Canada,” said Andrea Farnell, the community relations manager at Future Shop. “We look forward each year to seeing the applicants’ vision of how a Tech Lab grant could impact their students.”

Future Shop has awarded more than $1.75 million to more than 60 Canadian schools seeking upgrades to their classroom tech.

The Future Generation Tech Lab program has provided funding to both high schools and elementary schools throughout its history. Past grant winners have used the money at their discretion to bring higher-tech learning in classrooms, such as new computers and translation equipment to preserve a rare language on Vancouver Island. One winner built a a comprehensive media and broadcasting program in Ontario, while still another was able to offer senior students web courses for distance learning at a rural school.

Applications for Future Shop’s Future Generation Tech Lab program are now being accepted online in English or French at www.futureshop.ca/techlab. The closing date is Friday, May 23. Winners will be announced in June.

Joseph Czikk

Joseph Czikk

Joseph Czikk previously has written for the National Post, Montreal Gazette, Vancouver Sun, Regina Leader Post, Techvibes and BC Business Online. Joseph often goes crazy on twitter during NHL and NFL games.